Why Isn’t the Bottom of a Wine Bottle Flat? (Solved!)

Why isn't the bottom of a wine bottle flat?

Have you ever wondered why some bottles of wine have an indentation on the bottom? What is the indentation for and why isn’t the bottom of a wine bottle flat?

Here’s what you need to know!

The indentation on the bottom of a wine bottle is called a punt. Prior to the industrial revolution, wine bottles were made by hand. Glass blowers would push the seam on the bottom of the bottle up to ensure that there were no sharp edges, and the bottle would stand upright.

These days wine bottles are machine-made, and the punt is simply a nod to tradition.

The punt does enhance the structural integrity of a bottle, but it’s only necessary for sparkling wine. Champagne and sparkling wine are pressurized, and the punt helps to distribute the pressure evenly.

Does a Deeper Punt Mean a Better Wine?

Some people believe that bottles of wine with an indentation are higher quality. It seems like most bottles of inexpensive wines have a flat bottom.

Is there any truth to this?

The presence and depth of a punt on the bottom of a bottle doesn’t tell you anything about the quality of the wine. Bottles with a punt are slightly more expensive to produce but the difference in cost is around ten cents per bottle, certainly not enough to claim the wine is better or more expensive!

The punt makes it easier to clean the inside of a wine bottle so that might be why some wine makers prefer them. Many wine enthusiasts believe that the area around a punt is an effective way to trap the sediment in red wine, keeping it out of your glass but neither of these reasons would contribute to a higher quality wine.

A bottle and glass of white wine

Does the Shape of a Wine Bottle Matter?

In the end (pun intended), the shape of a wine bottle doesn’t contribute to its flavor or quality. Don’t make a buying decision based on whether the bottle has a punt or not.

It’s fun to try new wines. If you find one you like, buy it again – and don’t obsess over the bottom of the bottle!

By Michael

Chief mixologist and cocktail enthusiast at Swizzle Club.